music-related; previously focused on obscurity, lately altogether unfocused

list of tags

 

Played 31,211 times

captainharrison:

dreambeatles:

forgetbacktome:

Imagine by John Lennon sped up and Band On the Run by Paul McCartney slowed down.

this is amazing

Not only is this incredibly good, but it shows how they still composed with/for each other despite the end of The Beatles

perpetua:

I am playing around with a new checklist quiz format at BuzzFeed, and decided to start off by making a canon of pop music from the past 40 years. I looked around and found it weird that there haven’t been many lists like this made elsewhere. If nothing, it’s kinda neat to just scroll down and look at it like a chronological history of pop music.

The greatest-hits-albums-are-for-housewives-and-little-girls quotient for this list seems a bit high here. Really underscores how non-album-oriented pop was even in the album-oriented era. Maybe that’s why there’s not many lists like this.
I know for myself there is pop I intensely adore and pop I intensely loathe, so I’m interested in knowing if there were any “objective” criteria for curating the list – not for the sake of criticism, but for the sake of ongoing discussion of definitions of “pop,” “greatest pop albums,” “most perfect pop records,” &c. Can there be any consensus beyond the obvious (i.e. – lots of folks bought these records)? This is something of keen interest to me.

perpetua:

I am playing around with a new checklist quiz format at BuzzFeed, and decided to start off by making a canon of pop music from the past 40 years. I looked around and found it weird that there haven’t been many lists like this made elsewhere. If nothing, it’s kinda neat to just scroll down and look at it like a chronological history of pop music.

The greatest-hits-albums-are-for-housewives-and-little-girls quotient for this list seems a bit high here. Really underscores how non-album-oriented pop was even in the album-oriented era. Maybe that’s why there’s not many lists like this.

I know for myself there is pop I intensely adore and pop I intensely loathe, so I’m interested in knowing if there were any “objective” criteria for curating the list – not for the sake of criticism, but for the sake of ongoing discussion of definitions of “pop,” “greatest pop albums,” “most perfect pop records,” &c. Can there be any consensus beyond the obvious (i.e. – lots of folks bought these records)? This is something of keen interest to me.

Played 147 times

everygreatsongever:

The Stooges: “1970” (Funhouse, 1970)

Scott Asheton died the other day. I’ve hardly written anything here this year, but I couldn’t let that pass without some sort of tribute. Asheton was the drummer for a lot of bands, but the one that really matters is the Stooges.

Formed in Ann Arbor in 1967, when the band hit the Detroit rock scene, it was truly something different for its time. Iggy Pop gets a lot of the credit for that. He was hte wild frontman, after all, and it’s pretty much impossible to spend much time around someone who’s been on the Detroit scene for more than 20 years without hearing some sort of weird story about him.

But Iggy getting shirtless and bloody and confusing the hell out of people is just a fraction of what made that band special. Asheton and his guitarist brother Rob each brought a sound to the band that hadn’t been heard before, and on record, where you can’t see any of the flailing, their presence is arguably greater and more important than Iggy’s to what the band left behind. (Dave Alexander was great too, but it’s honestly harder to carve out a space that’s totally your own as a bass player.)

I wanted to feature a track from their second album, because Don Gallucci’s production on Funhouse really puts Asheton’s drumming right in your lap, dry and unadorned. “1970” in particular is Asheton at his best, holding down a shuffling rock beat, but doing it in a way that simultaneously grounds and contributes to the sense of chaos and madness at the heart of the song. He rarely just pounded out a straight beat (ironically, the tightest conventional rock beat on the whole album is on “Loose”).

His drumming created the sense that everything could fly apart at any minute, but that we were going to keep surging forward as long as it held together. It was a little like the rivets on an airplane wing rattling out of place as the pilot barely avoided catastrophy by sticking a rough landing. If you wanted to be an effective rock drummer after Scott Asheton, you had to learn more tricks than just throwing in a fill here and there.

Asheton was great at what he did. He was influential—Mogwai even named an album after his “Rock Action” nickname—but he was also the kind of musician other musicians liked to work with, as evidenced by his extremely long CV. He’ll be missed.

douglaswolk:

mirrormaskcamera:

The original hand-written Oblique Strategies by Brian Eno and Peter Schmidt, 1974

(via BRIAN ENO/ DARK SHARK)

Auto-reblog for being one of the greatest influences on me.

Wow

(Source: kadrey)

Kraftwerk – “Numbers/Computer World”
1981.09.13
Nagoya Shi Koukai Do, Nagoya, Japan

Echo & the Bunnymen – “All My Colours”
1982.07.14
The Haçienda, Manchester

Elvis Costello & The Attractions – “Lipstick Vogue”
1978.05.04
Orpheum Theatre, Boston

Incendiary!

The Clash – “The Call Up”

Was all their time in New York beginning to affect The Clash at this point? Um… maybe a little :D

Love this one.

The Police – “Spirits In The Material World”

This sounds better elsewhere, but it’s good to see the group having a bit of fun here with Kenny Everett. This is my favorite Police track by a wide margin.

There is no political solution
To our troubled evolution
Have no faith in constitution
There is no bloody revolution

We are spirits in the material world

Our so-called leaders speak
With words, they try to jail you
They subjugate the meek
But it’s the rhetoric of failure

Where does the answer lie?
Living from day to day
If it’s something we can’t buy
There must be another way

Th’ Faith Healers - “Reptile Smile”

A most excellent example of how 1992 British groups began using earlier references (in this case, Can) to jostle slightly and otherwise alter their shoegaze noise nirvana.

Beat Happening – “Red Head Walking” b/w “Secret Picnic Spot”

Their 1990 Sub Pop single. One of my favorites. No explanation required.

Stereolab – “Surrealchemist”

Even more than philosophers

Aiming at no less than

The total transformation

Of man and the world

Begin with the dissolution

Of superfluous matters

So that desire

Consciousness are free

New man, new woman

Proud and free

New man, new woman

Happy to be

True life embodying pleasure

Principle’s noblest triumph

Over the cowering mendacity

Of bourgeois Christian civilization

Magnetic Fields – “All You Ever Do Is Walk Away”

Confession: Holiday is the only Magnetic Fields record that has ever resonated with me (but man, does it ever resonate with me).

Labradford – “Listening In Depth”

Richmond post-rockers Labradford had the right idea. The primary intention of their music—to shift the aesthetic balance so that the individual sounds themselves were more at the forefront, while things like melody, groove, and lyrics were less important—was still so new that they named the first song on their 1993 debut LP “Listening In Depth,” and they put a picture of a micrometer on the cover. Message received.